Metabolic Efficiency

Metabolic Efficiency: Friend and Certainly Not Foe

Metabolic Efficiency: Friend and Certainly Not Foe

Nutrition is a very touchy and emotional topic for many people, particularly athletes. Metabolic Efficiency Training and its nutrition strategies are commonly misinterpreted and misunderstood. Get more of the lowdown here, ya'll.

Amy’s story: From Weight Watchers to Metabolic Efficiency Training

Amy’s story: From Weight Watchers to Metabolic Efficiency Training

I have encountered many men and women who had either no success or very short-lived success with the WW program over the years, but this post is NOT to dismiss the potential benefits of WW. It is merely to tell a story about Amy and how she found "another way" for success.

My metabolic efficiency status leading into IMCDA

My metabolic efficiency status leading into IMCDA

In my work as a Sport Dietitian, I have guided many levels of triathletes with their daily and training nutrition leading up to Ironman.  But now it’s my turn to feel the challenges of Ironman nutrition.

My higher fat, lower carb diet is making me feel...

I bet you secretly want to read that my high-fat, low-carb diet is making me feel:

Gross
Slimy
Fat
Slow
Sluggish

Well.. nope. None of that. Since I started my nutrition experiment in November 2012, here's what I feel:

Energetic
Healthy
Happy
Satisfied
Focused

For reals.

(and although I don't weigh myself often, I know my weight is stable from how my clothes fit.)

My weekly training has started to increase (I'll share what I'm training for soon, I promise) but I've averaged between 9-13 hours per week in the past month.  I haven't yet re-tested my Metabolic Efficiency and labs since December, but I plan to do this in the next month to see how things are changing with my body's ability to utilize fat and preserve carbohydrate at different intensities on the bike.

In the meantime, I can gauge my metabolic efficiency throughout my every day by my steady energy levels, absence of sugar cravings, and observation that I stay full for a good 3-4 hours (sometimes more) after a meal.  A bonus benefit is a great mood, right from the get go each day!

Additional good news is that my training nutrition is right where I need it to be.  Meaning, I haven't needed to consume excess carbohydrate calories to fuel my workouts.  An example was yesterday:

  • 7:00am wake
  • 7:15am tea with half and half
  • 8:15am egg scramble (egg/egg whites, turkey sausage, feta, bell peppers, tomatoes, onions (all cooked in EVOO), avocado)
  • 10:30a FoodieFuel + nut butter
  • 11:15a indoor bike trainer for 2 hours 15 minutes, followed by 4 mile aerobic run (drank only water during the workout)
  • 2:45p leftover coconut cashew chicken veggie dish with almond milk protein shake
  • 6:30p ground buffalo + veggie "bowl" with salsa, cheese 

My pre-workout nutrition (breakfast + snack) came to about 25 grams of carbohydrate, far less than what standard sport nutrition recommendations are these days. I had great energy during both the bike and the run with no hunger pangs whatsoever, nor did I feel I had to raid the refrigerator when I was done.

I am feeling great with this pattern of nutrition and am excited to see how my body responds as I begin to increase my training volume in the upcoming months.  Here's to continued experimentation with Metabolic Efficiency Training! 

-Dina

6 Weeks after Nutrition Experiment

In my previous post, I described the nutrition intervention I began in November 2012 to follow a higher fat, moderate protein and lower carbohydrate daily nutrition pattern.  In this post, I want to share with you some of the exciting and interesting results...

The Scoop on "The Athlete's Food Guide to Metabolic Efficiency Training"

The Scoop on "The Athlete's Food Guide to Metabolic Efficiency Training"

"The Athlete's Food Guide to Metabolic Efficiency" is an e-book I co-authored with my colleague, Bob Seebohar.  I want to give you a quick "top 10 list" why this book would be a great addition to your personal library.  Ready?